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Black history month

By CYN LoPINTO
Editor-in-chief, gerontologist


black history monthAlthough January is associated with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., February is the month chosen as “Black History Month” in the United States. The man behind this celebration is Dr. Carter G. Woodson. Woodson was the son of slaves who went on to receive a Ph.D. from Harvard University. He made it his life’s mission that Blacks would be respectively portrayed and included in American history books.

In 1926, Dr. Woodson launched “Negro History Week” to pay tribute to contributions made by important African-Americans. He picked the second week in February since it contained the birthdays of two men who helped in the advancement of Blacks, Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.

In 1976, “Negro History Week” expanded into “Black History Month.” Take a look at some of the other important events that occurred during this significant month that helped February become synonymous with Black History.

February 23, 1868
W.E.B. DuBois, the co-founder of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), was born.

February 3, 1870
Blacks were finally given the right to vote on this day when the 15th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was passed.

February 25, 1870
Hiram R. Revels, the first African-American U.S. senator, was sworn into office.

February 12, 1909
In New York City, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was formed.

February 1, 1960
The famous lunch counter sit-in took place in Greensboro, North Carolina on this day.

February 21, 1965
Black Nationalist Malcolm X was assassinated by three Black Muslims in New York.

 

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Cynthia Lopinto

Cyn LoPinto, M.A. is a gerontologist focusing on significant issues affecting older adults and their families. Her areas of interest include lifestyle enrichment, family dynamics, and caregiver support. Cyn has worked in both the recreational and healthcare industries.

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